All posts by Steve Cook

Positive Note 1635

December 13, 2017

Memo To:  Executive Officers, Board Members, Chapter & Division Presidents & Others

From:  Frank Coppel, President

Positive Note 1635

Greetings Fellow Federationists:

 

By now all of you should have received your Statewide Seminar Letter.  Please fill out the form at the end of the Statewide Seminar letter and return it to the State Office as soon as possible.  You can also call the State Office at (803) 254-3777 and let us know if you are planning to attend the Statewide Seminar on January 6, 2018.  Please notify the State Office of your intentions in order that we may have an accurate count for the luncheon which will be free of charge.  Remember we will be conducting an auction throughout the day to raise money for the Federation Center.  Be sure to bring items for the auction such as, cakes, pies, cookies, gift baskets, and electronics.  Also, please continue to sell your Orlando National Convention bus tickets.  You can either mail your ticket stubs and money to the Federation Center or bring them with you to the Seminar on Saturday, January 6.  The drawing will take place at the conclusion of the Seminar.  The winning ticket will receive $300, the seller of the winning ticket will receive $100 and the chapter selling the most tickets will receive $300.

It is not too early to begin submitting your state dues of $10 for 2018 to the state office.  Remember that we need to have your name, address, phone number and email address if applicable.  This information does change from time to time and if we do not have updated information, we cannot keep you up to date on what’s going on.  The deadline for dues is January 31, 2018, so why wait!

We have an announcement from Joe Ruffalo, President of the NFB of New Jersey.  “The National Federation of the Blind of New Jersey’s technology division is proud to present our fourth   nationwide technology seminar featuring Marty Schultz and his Blindfold Games and more on Monday, December 18 at 8 PM.

Marty Schultz, owner of Blindfold Games, will tell us all about his apps that are made accessible for blind and visually impaired users on their favorite iOS powered devices such as an iPhone, iPad, or an iPod Touch. To learn more about Blindfold Games, please visit www.blindfoldgames.org.

To attend the call, dial 515-604-9570, then use access code 612068 pound. You will hear the code you entered repeated. Press 1 if it is correct. Press 2 to re-enter it. If you press 1, you then announce yourself by stating your name and you will then be entered into the conference call.

In order to obtain the best possible sound for the call, the host will put all callers into mute mode until the Q and A portion of the call. You will be able to hear everything during the call but background noise from your location will not disturb others listening in on the conversation. During the Q and A portion of the call, you can unmute yourself by pressing star 6. Before giving a comment or asking a question, please announce your name and what state you are from, and then wait for the moderator to recognize you before speaking. We can have too many people trying to seek the floor at one time and chaos can occur. The moderators will do their very best to recognize as many callers as possible however, they will determine the order in which speakers proceed. When finished with your comments or questions, press star 6 again to go back into “mute” mode to facilitate better, uncluttered communication for everyone. Star 6 also works when you have your phone on speaker.”

The National Federation of the Blind knows that blindness is not the characteristic that defines you or your future.  Every day, we raise the expectations of blind people because low expectations create obstacles between blind people and our dreams.  You can live the life you want:  blindness is not what holds you back.  Joining me for comments in this Positive Note is the President Emeritus of the NFB of SC.  Here is Dr. Capps.

The Christmas season brings out the best in just about everyone.  It is celebrated in different ways.  Each year there is a beautiful 35 foot Christmas fir tree placed in front of the State House steps on Gervais Street.  There are several thousand lights on this unique tree.  Thousands of people enjoy the annual tree lighting ceremony.  This tree represents both the City of Columbia and the state of South Carolina.  There are many Christmas trees beautifully decorated in various communities in Columbia, and of course, other communities statewide enjoy their Christmas decorations.  Last Christmas we attended the “Singing Christmas Tree” here in Columbia at the Shandon Baptist Church.  It was wonderful.  If you haven’t done so, you might consider this production.  It is free of charge.  Shandon Baptist was the first church I attended when I came to Columbia some 70 years ago in 1946.  The church grew rapidly, requiring the construction of a much larger church.  Shandon Baptist is located on Forest Drive.  I am looking forward to our Columbia Chapter meeting this Thursday evening, December 14.  It will feature a wonderful banquet, a Christmas message and an attendance of around 100.  There will also be a gift exchange.  The many things taking place attributes to the many beautiful sites and special programs.  It even snowed four inches over the weekend at Rocky Bottom and it didn’t miss our Christmas Board Retreat by very much.

 

Final Thought:  “Christmas is doing a little something extra for someone.” ― Charles M. Schulz

Positive Note 1634

December 6, 2017

Memo To:  Executive Officers, Board Members, Chapter & Division Presidents & Others

From:  Frank Coppel, President

Positive Note 1634

Greetings Fellow Federationists:

 

The 38th annual Christmas Board Retreat held at Rocky Bottom this past weekend was extremely busy as many of us participated in two board meetings on Saturday (RBRCCB Board of Directors which was held 9:30 a.m. and the of the Board of Directors of the NFB of SC which was held at 2:00 p.m.).  The 2018 edition of Children’s camp will be held June 9, to June 16.  The dates for the 2018 Senior Camps will be May 20-24 and September 16-20.  Ed Bible, Vice Chairman of the RBRCCB Board of Directors, gave an extensive report regarding the overall operations of the camp.  Mr. Bible stated there has been a great deal of work done regarding the infrastructure of our facilities at Rocky Bottom such as repairing the septic tank, pump, termite damage in Osterneck and other repairs.  Mr. Bible also thanked the individuals, church groups, and civic organizations who have volunteered their services in the area of building and ground maintenance during the past eight months at Rocky Bottom.  The board also had a thorough discussion regarding the rental fees for the sighted public as well as the reservation or processing fees we are currently charging at Rocky Bottom.  The board voted unanimously to increase rental and processing fees beginning January 1, 2018.  A thorough explanation of the increases will be discussed at the Statewide Seminar on January 6.  The board discussed the 2017 Fun Day Festival and ideas as to how we can significantly improve the overall proceeds for the camp.  The Board also agreed that the Fund Raising Committee consisting of Jennifer Bazer, Ed Bible, Valerie Warrington, Linda Bible, and Debra Canty will start planning for this event in January and the committee will update their progress to the board at the Spring meeting.    During the NFB of SC State Board meeting, a variety of topics were discussed.  The Board heard a report from Debra Canty, Chairperson of the Fund Raising Committee who reported the third annual Sweetheart Dance will be held on Saturday, February 17, 2018 at the Federation Center of the Blind.  All proceeds raised from the dance will be given to the NFB of SC.  Jamie Allison, Chairperson of the Youth Recruitment Committee discussed with the board the various strategies her committee was considering to attract families of blind children and younger individuals to the NFB of SC.  Ms. Allison reported her committee has discussed the possibility of hosting a virtual youth Rally during the first quarter of 2018 and establishing a mentoring program which hopefully will start in the very near future.  David Houck, Federation Center of the Blind Director, gave an excellent report.  Mr. Houck reported the Federation Center continues to be financially sound and that the Center is looking to expand its assistive technology training programs.  The Washington Seminar was discussed and will begin on Sunday, January 28, 2018 with the “great gathering in” meeting being held on Monday, January 29, at 5:00 p.m.  Room rates for the Washington Seminar are $192 per night plus a 14.5 percent room tax.  Please call the Holiday Inn Capitol at (877) 572-6951 and referencing booking code FB8 to make your reservation.  All reservations must be made by December 28.  If you wish to attend or have questions regarding the Washington Seminar, please call me at (803) 796-8662.  I want to take this opportunity to especially thank Lenora Robertson and her “food crew” for all of their hard work preparing the delicious meals throughout the weekend.  I also would like to thank each of you who attended Rocky Bottom this weekend for making the Christmas Board Retreat an extremely enjoyable and pleasant experience for Shelley and myself.

We have an announcement from Loretta Green and Isaiah Nelson.  “The NFB of SC is planning a charter bus trip to the Jernigan Institute (our national headquarters) in Baltimore, Maryland the weekend of April 6-8.  The cost to ride the charter bus will be $100 per person.  The initial $25 is due by January 6, at the statewide seminar and the remainder of the money is due no later than Friday, February 23 2018.  If you have any questions, regarding this trip you can contact Loretta Green at (843) 276-9649 or Isaiah Nelson at (803) 413-2434.”

The National Federation of the Blind knows that blindness is not the characteristic that defines you or your future.  Every day, we raise the expectations of blind people because low expectations create obstacles between blind people and our dreams.  You can live the life you want:  blindness is not what holds you back.  Joining me for comments in this Positive Note is the President Emeritus of the NFB of SC.  Here is Dr. Capps.

I have been attending Christmas Board Retreats at RBRCCB for several decades and I can vouch in telling you that this Board Retreat was the best or near the best of all of them.  It was apparent that the 40 members from across the state were in great spirits and having a wonderful time.  I attended all of the RBRCCB board meeting as well as the NFB of SC board meeting.  President Frank Coppel had prepared for the board meetings, providing excellent planning apparent.  At the RBRCCB board meeting the board increased the rentals for the facilities as there had not been any increase for more than a decade.  There was considerable discussion about planning for the 2018 Fun Day Festival.  This is a major event for RBRCCB and our best effort statewide is essential if we are going to improve on our net profits.  We talked about a variety of things affecting Fun Day and encouraged greater participation including Fun Day ticket sales and food donations.  The board meeting of the NFB of SC was held Saturday afternoon following the luncheon.  As always, Lenora Robertson and her kitchen crew did an excellent job on all meals featuring an excellent Christmas banquet.  I’m pleased that the board recognizes the advantages of the convention being held in Columbia because of its central location.  President Coppel is handling this important issue.  It appears that we will have an excellent delegation for the annual Washington Seminar.  I’m sure we will be represented well.  The Christmas banquet was delightful with high spirits.  We were glad to welcome our Advisory Board Chairman, Mr. John Sarpy and his lovely wife Linda.  He made some brief comments to the gathering.  As always, David Houck, Executive Director of the Federation Center of the Blind, brought the Christmas message on Luke chapter 2.  This was followed by group singing including the “12 Days of Christmas” which was not performed with excellence.  It was fun, however.  This was followed by the distribution of gifts.  Then there was the partaking of a variety of desserts which everyone enjoyed.  Everyone departed Sunday morning and returned home safely.  It would be difficult to top this annual Christmas Board Retreat.  Linda Bible, Resident Manager of RBRCCB, was recognized for her excellent job in this role.  Incidentally, Linda advised me that there are now six ducks in the Eddie Mae Lucas Webb Memorial Pond.  JJ, the RBRCCB resident duck, has been very productive as there were only three ducks a few weeks ago.  I want to close this Positive Note by congratulating all of you who attended the Christmas Board Retreat and made this a wonderful event.

 

Final Thought:  “Christmas is the season to kindle the fire of hospitality.” – Washington Irvin

Positive Note 1633

November 28, 2017

Memo To:  Executive Officers, Board Members, Chapter & Division Presidents & Others

From:  Frank Coppel, President

Positive Note 1633

Greetings Fellow Federationists:

 

We are writing this edition of the Positive Note earlier than usual in order that you may receive it prior to the Christmas Board Retreat which will be held this weekend, December 1, 2, and 3, at Rocky Bottom.  Saturday, December 2, promises to be a very busy day.  We will kick things off Saturday morning with the Rocky Bottom Retreat and Conference Center of the Blind Board of Directors meeting at 9:30, followed by the National Federation of the Blind of South Carolina Board of Directors meeting which will begin at 2:00 p.m.  We will have our holiday dinner at 6:30 Saturday evening and immediately afterwards we will gather around the Christmas tree and celebrate the Christmas season as we sing carols, exchange gifts, fellowship, and sample a variety of delicious desserts which I am certain many of you are planning to bring.  If you wish to participate in the Christmas gift exchange Saturday evening, ladies will need to bring a ladies’ gift and men will need to bring a men’s gift.  I am asking Julie Bible and Diana Singleton to be responsible for the distribution of the Christmas gifts Saturday evening.  The schedule for meals throughout the weekend are as follows; Saturday morning breakfast will be served at 8:30 a.m., lunch at 1:00 p.m., dinner at 6:30 p.m. and Sunday morning we will have a continental breakfast at 8:30 a.m.

The month of December is a busy time in the NFB of SC as many chapters hold parties to celebrate the Christmas season.  If you would like for me to attend your Christmas party please contact me at (803)796-8662 or you can email me at frankcoppel@att.net and I will try to attend.  At this time, Shelley and I have been invited to the Sumter Christmas banquet On December 12, the Cherokee County Christmas party on December 14, and the Chesterfield County luncheon on December 15.

As we approach the end of 2017, I would like to remind everyone that this is a great time to pay your 2018 state dues of $10.  Article XII of the NFB of SC state Constitution states, “The dues of this organization shall be $10 per year, payable during the month of January.  No person may vote who is delinquent in the payment of his/her dues.”  The dead line for submitting dues is January 31, 2018.

I am sad to report Dr. Dennis Abdella, a longtime friend of the blind passed away Friday morning, November 24.  Dr. Abdella worked at the South Carolina Commission for the Blind for approximately 28 years (1973 until 2001) where he established a horticulture vocational training program and where he was very successful placing blind consumers throughout the state in this field of work.  Dr. Abdella, who was known as “Doc”, by the blind and staff of the Commission of the Blind, was very passionate about his work and was always willing to provide assistance to students even after these students graduated from his program and were placed in employment.  At the 2011 State convention banquet in Columbia, Dennis Abdella was recognized by the NFB of SC for his many years of dedicated service to the blind of South Carolina as he was the recipient of the Distinguish Service Award, the highest award given to a sighted individual outside the organization.  Dr. Abdella was a colleague and a true friend and I along with many other blind individuals will miss him a great deal.

Finally, I hope all of you had a blessed Thanksgiving.  We currently are expecting over forty people to attend the Board Retreat. Remember to check in with our Resident manager, Linda Bible, for your room assignment Friday evening.  I look forward to seeing many of you this weekend and celebrating the Christmas season at Rocky Bottom with my federation family.

The National Federation of the Blind knows that blindness is not the characteristic that defines you or your future.  Every day, we raise the expectations of blind people because low expectations create obstacles between blind people and our dreams.  You can live the life you want:  blindness is not what holds you back.  Joining me for comments in this Positive Note is the President Emeritus of the NFB of SC.  Here is Dr. Capps.

Now that Thanksgiving is behind us, we turn our attention to the Christmas season.  In the Federation, we think of the annual Christmas Board Retreat as the official beginning of the Christmas season.  According to President Coppel there will be about a 40 member Federation family at the Christmas Board Retreat meeting.  Federationists from across the state will be attending.  We are fortunate in having our own facilities to handle both rooms and food service because of dedicated members.  Our first Christmas Board Retreat was in December of 1980 as that was the time Osterneck Cottage was completed for use.  The next overnight accommodation was the Oglesby Cottage.  That is a good story arising out of the construction of the Oglesby Cottage.  In the Federation it is our policy to go out of our way to treat each other with the utmost respect and understanding.  The following is a perfect case.  The 1983 state convention was held in Columbia.  Bob Oglesby was a longtime NFB of SC leader and served in high offices.  He was a candidate for First Vice President at the 1983 convention but fell slightly short of victory.  He was so disappointed that his wife Pearl told me that as soon as he arrived back home in Spartanburg he went immediately to bed.  Pending his extreme reaction I attempted to do something to encourage him and at the same time help the Federation.  I managed to get a speaking engagement at a Spartanburg Chapter meeting and told the Spartanburg Chapter members that if they would vote to give $5,000 toward the construction of the cottage, we would name it the Robert Lee Oglesby Cottage.  They voted unanimously to do so.  Bob was so pleased that he secured thousands of dollars of construction materials which assisted us in Oglesby Cottage being built.  Thus, this was the successful beginning of this much appreciated mountain chalet.  The use of this facility is still popular.  Seven years later in July of 1991 we celebrated the dedication of the Conference Center.  During its construction an associate member in the Upstate questioned the wisdom of building the Conference Center.  I assured her it would ultimately be of great use to this program.  Oddly enough this same party wanted the job as Executive Director but understandably her request was declined.  This week we will be celebrating the 26th annual Christmas Board Retreat in the Conference Center.  Not only are the blind utilizing these facilities but different groups are also enjoying its use.  We’re thankful in having our own excellent facilities.  I haven’t missed a Christmas Board Retreat since its beginning and I trust that I will be present this weekend.

 

Final Thought:  As Christmas approaches we share the season’s greetings with many others including federationists, family and friends.

Positive Note 1632

November 21, 2017

Memo To:  Executive Officers, Board Members, Chapter & Division Presidents & Others

From:  Frank Coppel, President

Positive Note 1632

Greetings Fellow Federationists:

 

It appears we will have a good turnout for the 2017 Christmas Board Retreat which will be held at Rocky Bottom the weekend of December 1, 2, and 3.  On your arrival to Rocky Bottom Friday evening December 1, please stop by the Resident Manager’s apartment and Linda Bible will notify you of your room assignment for the weekend.  We will do all we can to provide comfortable sleeping accommodations for everyone, however, we are expecting over forty individuals for the weekend and therefore, all of us need to be understanding and demonstrate a spirit of good will during the brief time we will be at Rocky Bottom.  Breakfast on Saturday morning, December 2, will be served at 8:30, lunch at 1:00 p.m., and the Christmas dinner at 6:30 p.m.  On Sunday morning, December 3, breakfast will be served at 8:00.  Remember, if you wish to participate in the Christmas gift exchange Saturday evening, ladies will need to bring a ladies’ gift and men will need to bring a men’s gift.  The cost of the Christmas gift should be a minimum of $10.  Also, please remember to bring bake goods such as cakes and cookies so that we have a large variety of Christmas desserts to sample during our Christmas festivities Saturday evening.

We have an announcement from Steve Cook, President of the Computer Science and Technology Division.  “The Computer Science and Technology Division of the NFB of SC will hold a drawing at the Statewide Seminar on January 6, 2018.  We are drawing for an Amazon Echo Dot.  This is a personal assistant device that allows you to speak commands, and the Dot, commonly called Alexa, will answer questions, set timers or alarms, can give you requested information, play music, and much more.  Tickets are a donation of only $2 each or 3 tickets for $5!  We will be selling between now and the seminar.  You may contact Steve Cook, CSTD president at (803) 254-0222, or (803) 260-1292 for more information or to purchase your tickets.  Good luck!”

Finally, I want to take this opportunity to wish you and your family a very blessed and Happy Thanksgiving.  Let’s take a few minutes Thursday to reflect and give thanks for our families, our country, and to our organization, the National Federation of the Blind, which is working very hard to improve the quality of life of blind people.

The National Federation of the Blind knows that blindness is not the characteristic that defines you or your future.  Every day, we raise the expectations of blind people because low expectations create obstacles between blind people and our dreams.  You can live the life you want:  blindness is not what holds you back.  Joining me for comments in this Positive Note is the President Emeritus of the NFB of SC.  Here is Dr. Capps.

Happy Thanksgiving to all of you across the state.  The Federation played a key role in my observance of different Thanksgivings.  The first Thanksgiving I actually remember attending was observed by me at the School for the Blind in 1939.  This was good and bad for me.  In those days the School closed down for the most part with only a few students remaining who lived a distance from the School who were not able to go home.   A couple of my fellow students were nice enough to invite me to their home during Thanksgiving – the late Tommy Ingle being one of them.  Tommy’s parents lived in Greenville and it was an easy drive for them to go to the School and get Tommy and myself.  I lived in Mullins in the off season and this was a long distance to the School, requiring me to stay with a handful of students who were like myself.  I began attending Thanksgivings in the late 1950’s at the Columbia Chapter.  I recall the Columbia Chapter sponsoring a Thanksgiving dinner at a Columbia restaurant on Two Notch Road.  The first Thanksgiving dinner was held at the Federation Center in 1961.  The Center had just been dedicated a month earlier on October 15.  The late Connie Jumper and Rev. Ken Jumper were members of the Columbia Chapter.  For more than a decade now, Rev. Ken Jumper and his church, “The Church of the Harvest,” has been sponsoring a Thanksgiving dinner at the Federation Center.  The ladies of the church cooked the food and served it as well at the Center.  Not too long after the Center was dedicated there was a program enabling churches in the Columbia area to deliver food baskets to the blind and Betty and I distributed these baskets for many years with the blind being very appreciative.  I attended my first national board Thanksgiving dinner in Berkley, California hosted by the NFB Founder, Dr. Jacobus tenBroek in about 1960 with my having been elected to the national board in July of 1959.  Thanksgiving would soon affect my responsibility to be present for NFB board meetings.  By this time our two children, Craig and Beth had been born, Craig in 1955 and Beth in 1958.  It was hard for us to leave the children but we had been fortunate in securing two wonderful retired ladies known as Aunt Lela and Aunt Mattie.  These wonderful ladies lived in the Olympia section of Columbia with one living reasonably close to the Center.  When we attended national board meetings we could always count on Aunt Leia and Aunt Mattie as they were very good with the children.  When Dr. tenBroek died in March of 1968, the 1968 convention was held in Des Moines where Dr. Jernigan headed up the Iowa Commission for the Blind.  General meetings were hosted at the Iowa Commission for the Blind and NFB board meetings were held at the NFB headquarters.  Overnight accommodations were handled at hotels in the general area.  In 1978 Dr. Jernigan, after serving the Iowa Commission for the Blind for 20 years, moved to Baltimore where he established the National Center for the Blind.  I attended national board meetings for some 35 years from 1978 to 2011.  By this time I was now in my 70’s and time for retirement from my board responsibilities for the most part.  My Thanksgiving meetings were meaningful.  I am blessed to have been able to participate in many federation functions.  I hope that your Thanksgiving service this week is meaningful as well.

 

Final Thought:  People list things they do not discuss with family during Thanksgiving.  Spend Thanksgiving counting your blessings and giving thanks to God for his mercy and grace.

Positive Note 1631

November 15, 2017
Memo To:  Executive Officers, Board Members, Chapter & Division Presidents & Others
From:  Frank Coppel, President
Positive Note 1631
Greetings Fellow Federationists:

We still have not heard from some of you as to whether you are planning to attend the 2017 Christmas Board Retreat which will be held at Rocky Bottom December 1, 2, and 3.
This will be a busy time since we will be holding two Board meetings beginning with the RBRCCB Board of Directors meeting Saturday morning, December 2, at 9:30 a.m. which will be followed by the NFB of SC Board of Directors meeting on Saturday afternoon at 2:00 p.m.
Saturday evening will be a time for observing the Christmas season, as we sing Christmas carols, fellowship, and sample delicious desserts.
If you wish to participate in the Christmas gift exchange Saturday evening, ladies will need to bring a ladies’ gift and men will need to bring a men’s gift.
The cost of the Christmas gift should be a minimum of $10.
I hope we will have a large turnout for the weekend.
Make plans to be there!

I am very sad to report Jerry Whittle, a longtime leader of the National Federation of the blind passed away Friday, November 10, in Ruston Louisiana.
Jerry began his Federation journey in South Carolina while he was a student at Clemson University during the late 1970’s.
My first wife, Gail, and I became acquainted with Jerry in 1979 at a Student Division meeting in Columbia at the Federation Center.
We became friends and worked closely together on a number of local and state Federation activities.
Throughout the years, I have had the opportunity to speak to Jerry at NFB national conventions and I have enjoyed attending many of his plays performed by the students from the Louisiana Center for the Blind.
I was very excited for Jerry and his wife, Marilyn, when they received the 2016 Jacobus tenBroek Award from Dr. Maurer during the NFB banquet in recognition of their outstanding work in the field of blindness and their continued desire to encourage blind people “to live the life they want”.
There are many other memories I could share regarding Jerry, however, I will conclude my portion of the Positive Note by saying Jerry Whittle was a friend and a colleague who believed very strongly in the potential and abilities of his fellow blind and who worked tirelessly to improve the quality of life of blind people.

The National Federation of the Blind knows that blindness is not the characteristic that defines you or your future.
Every day, we raise the expectations of blind people because low expectations create obstacles between blind people and our dreams.
You can live the life you want:  blindness is not what holds you back.
Joining me for comments in this Positive Note is the President Emeritus of the NFB of SC.
Here is Dr. Capps.

I was in real shock to be notified by our good friend Marshall Tucker of the death of Jerry Whittle, age 70, occurring last Friday, November 10.
It’s my understanding his sudden death was due to an eruption of a cerebral aneurism.
He and his wife Merilynn were residing in Ruston, Louisiana at the time of his death.
It’s my understanding Jerry had been retired just a short while ago.
We first met Jerry in the late 1970’s when we were attempting to organize a chapter in the Oconee County area.
A dinner meeting was held in Westminster on December 3, 1977 and Jerry was in attendance.
Not only was he present for the dinner meeting, he wound up being elected President.
Prior to this dinner meeting, I had talked with Jerry about his discouragement concerning his blindness.
He soon snapped out of his discouragement to become a federationist for life.
He was in the federation for 40 years from December 1977 to November 2017.
Jerry loved Rocky Bottom having served as the first voluntary caretaker in 1979.
He used room 5 in Osterneck Cottage which became known as the Oconee Room.
Demonstrating his acting skills, he participated in the “Glass Menagerie” written by Tennessee Williams, which was performed by an all blind cast in the historic Dr. Samuel Miller Lawton Hall.
A happy incident occurred involving Jerry when he accidentally got two inches too close to the edge of the stage, but he hopped up so quickly I hardly noticed the difference.
Jerry worked at the Federation Center a short while but recognizing the need for a maximum education, he graduated from Clemson University and subsequently received his Masters from the University of Tennessee.
By that time Jerry had many successful blind acquaintances including Joanne Wilson who headed the Louisiana Center for the Blind.
It was these contacts which would mold the highly successful career for Jerry.
He also became the First Vice President of the NFB of Louisiana.
He wrote a play which was performed at the NFB national convention which provided much needed funding.
Jerry was known nationally for his federation activity.
He would go on to be the recipient of the highest NFB award at the 2016 NFB convention banquet, the Jacobus tenBroek Award.
As he often did, he gave credit to others, whereas it was apparent he was primarily responsible for their success.
Even during the presentation of the Jacobus tenBroek Award at the NFB convention in 2016, Jerry gave credit to others including myself.
We are very appreciative of this incident.
While we certainly will muss Jerry, he had been a beloved figure to his friends nationally.
We extend condolences to his lovely wife Merilynn who was always at his side.

 

Final Thought:  Be thankful for being able to live the life you want because of the Federation which laid the groundwork since 1944.

 

OBITUARY-Jerry Whittle
Jerry Whittle was born on January 10, 1947 in Seneca, South Carolina, and passed away on November 10, 2017 surrounded by family and friends.
He was preceded in death by his parents, Delzie Cleo McGuffin Whittle and Ambus “Pat” Whittle; his sister, Patsy Louise Whittle; and by his first wife, Karin Winkle Whittle.

He is survived by his dear wife Merilynn Whittle; daughter Christina Ann Richardson Pedro and spouse John Pedro II; son John Bee Richardson and spouse Laurie Ann Lusk ; grandchildren Xavier Pedro, Giana Pedro, Tessa Boyle, Jonathan Richardson, and Sara Elizabeth Richardson; several great-grandchildren; nephews and niece Roger “Dale” Chrisley, Danus Chrisley, Marilyn Jane “Janie” Chrisley Davis; brother-in-law Miles “Smoky” Chrisley; cousins Mary Venaas, Joan Dunlap, Jimmy Powell, Wayne Powell, Ronnie Phillips, and many others; and the countless students to whom he served as a mentor and father figure.

Mr. Whittle was a proud graduate of Clemson University, where he earned a degree in English, and from the University of Tennessee in Knoxsville where he earned a master’s degree in Creative Writing.
While he held various oc’cup’ations throughout his lifetime, his passion for language and literacy led him to teach braille at the Louisiana Center for the Blind for over three decades.
He worked with over 1,000 students, giving them the gift of braille literacy, and taught countless teachers and blindness professionals that braille literacy is a key for success for blind children and adults.
Through his work in the National Federation of the Blind, Mr. Whittle was also able to transform countless other lives and serve in many leadership positions, both in Louisiana and nationally.
His signature sense of humor, his willingness to share his life experiences, and his ability to establish genuine connections with people from all walks of life positioned him as an icon in the blind community.

Jerry loved baseball, gardening, reading, writing, and bluegrass.
He often persuaded Merilynn to bake him cornbread or apple pie, two of his favorites.
He was an engaging public speaker, a gifted braille teacher, a prolific author and playwright, a loyal friend, and a deeply faithful Christian.
Yet, the essence of his life is only partially captured by these qualities.
The life that Jerry Whittle led was one of sacrifice, service, and spirit.
With his incomparable wit, and his unwavering devotion to the people that he loved, the influence that Jerry Whittle has had on this world will undoubtedly ring energetically for generations to come.

The writings of William Faulkner always remained close to Mr. Whittle’s heart. “You cannot swim for new horizons until you have courage to lose sight of the shore.” With these words from his beloved author, we begin to say good-bye to our teacher, mentor, and friend.
Beyond this, these words remind us to live with the courage and determination that Mr. Whittle both embodied and challenged each of us to achieve in our own lives.

Visitation is on Monday, November 13, 2017, from 5:00-7:00 pm at Kilpatrick Funeral Home in Ruston, Louisiana.
A second visitation and burial will be held in South Carolina, with visitation and services held at Duckett-Robinson Funeral Home in Central, South Carolina.
Visitation will be from 5:00 – 7:00pm on November 18th and again on November 19th from 1:00-2:00pm.
The funeral services will be held at 2:00pm on November 19th.
He will be buried at Memory Gardens in Clemson, South Carolina.

In lieu of flowers, you may make a donation to the Buddy Program of the Louisiana Center for the Blind at www.louisianacenter.org.

 

Positive Note 1630

November 8, 2017

Memo To:  Executive Officers, Board Members, Chapter & Division Presidents & Others

From:  Frank Coppel, President

Positive Note 1630

Greetings Fellow Federationists:

 

I am certain by now Board members of RBRCCB and the NFB of SC as well as Chapter and Division Presidents have received their letter regarding the Rocky Bottom Christmas Board Retreat on December 1-3.  Please notify the State Office as soon as possible of your intentions for attending this Retreat, in order that we may have an accurate head count to purchase food for the four meals being served (Saturday breakfast, lunch, dinner, and Sunday breakfast) as well as making the necessary sleeping accommodations.  I am confident we will have near 100 percent of our board members in attendance and we will have an excellent turnout of Chapter and Division Presidents present for the weekend.

I trust all of you are continuing to work extremely hard selling your 2018 Orlando National Convention bus tickets.  I am hopeful ticket sales and what we charge for each seat will cover the cost for the chartered bus.  As has been the case in previous years, the cost of each bus ticket is $1.  The drawing will be held at the conclusion of the Statewide Seminar scheduled for Saturday, January 6, 2018.  The individual who purchases the winning ticket will receive $300, the seller of the winning ticket will receive $100 and the chapter who sells the most tickets will receive $300.  If you are lucky and purchase bus tickets yourself, you could win a grand total of $400.  Remember, 2018 will be the last year the NFB National Convention will be held in Orlando, Florida.  Let’s work very hard selling these bus tickets so we can provide transportation to as many of our members as possible to attend the 2018 National convention in Orlando.

We have an announcement from this week’s NFB President’s Notebook regarding the NFB National Scholarship Program.  “We are accepting scholarship applications from November 1, 2017, to March 31, 2018. This annual program offers thirty scholarships worth from $3,000 to $12,000 to eligible students, from high school seniors beginning their freshman year in the fall semester of 2017, up through graduate students working on their PhD degrees. Go to www.nfb.org/scholarships for complete rules and requirements.”

The National Federation of the Blind knows that blindness is not the characteristic that defines you or your future.  Every day, we raise the expectations of blind people because low expectations create obstacles between blind people and our dreams.  You can live the life you want:  blindness is not what holds you back.  Joining me for comments in this Positive Note is the President Emeritus of the NFB of SC.  Here is Dr. Capps.

We are spotlighting a talented individual in this week’s Positive Note as you will see.  I refer to Ed Bible.  Ed Bible was born in Laurens, SC. Two years later his father joined the U.S. Air Force and retired from the military twenty years later.  As a result his family moved a lot, growing up from Washington, to Germany, to California and ending up in Syracuse, NY.

Ed graduated from Rome Free Academy, in Rome, NY.  This was before the days of vision teachers or any professional assistance while attending public school.  He asked a pretty girl in his history class to read the text to him during study hall. That is how Ed got to know Julie. Julie went to Syracuse University while she finished up her last year of high school and then she went to a business school.  Ed and Julie were married on Griffiss Air Force Base the summer before his Senior year of College on June 23, 1973. They have been married and have had quite an interesting journey together.  They have two children. The oldest is Jennifer Walker. She has been married to Matt Walker now for 13 years. They have all the grandchildren so far; Ethan who will be six this month and his sister Sally (named after Julie’s mother) and she is only two months old.  Our son  Ashton has been married to Dondra for seven years and they have recently purchased a new large home in Quail Valley in Irmo.

Ed Bible’s friend Frank Coppel encouraged him to join the NFB in 1985.  At the time they were members of the Cayce-West Columbia Jaycees together. Julie and Ed have been active in the NFB ever since.  Their children grew up in the NFB and have attended most every state convention when they were young and many National conventions, giving them a rare opportunity to travel with their federation friends.  Julie and Ed’s first convention was in Chicago in 1988, and they can only guess at the number of conventions they have attended, but it was rare when they did not attend.  Ed says it would be more than twenty of them, and every convention was unique in what they learned as it made them better federationists. Also, each trip was an adventure, giving them hours of stories to retell later.

Ed has held many positions within the NFB of SC from Columbia Chapter board member to his current positions as a Member of the NFB of SC state board for many years, Federation Board of Trustees where he now serves as its Vice Chairman, and this past year as Vice chairman of Rocky Bottom.  Ed has also been the grateful recipient of several awards of recognition from the Donald C. Capps Award to the one he just received, the Presidential Citation.

After receiving his B.S. in Education from Syracuse University he of course had difficulty finding a job as a blind teacher. He did many odd jobs until his mother convinced him to come back to SC. He began his career as a Recruiter for Snelling and Snelling Staffing where he had a successful career whereupon he was recruited by Don Bradly from the SC Commission for the Blind.  He began as a VR Counselor and after 32 years ended his career as the Director of Training & Employment as a senior manager for the last 14 years of his career.

Ed has been honored to be appointed by the Governor to the Board of Commissioners for SCSDB where he proudly represents the interests of blind students and supporters of SCSDB.  He has also been elected to be Treasurer of the of SC Commission for the Blind’s Foundation board.

Ed Bible attends Mt. Hebron United Methodist Church in West Columbia, whose members have made several mission trips to Rocky Bottom to help with repairs. His hobby is reading.  There are many other accomplishments and involvements which Ed and Julie Bible have made, however, space does not allow us to list all of them.  We appreciate the many contributions Ed has made to improve the quality of life for blind South Carolinians.

 

Final Thought:  Aside from October 15 being White Cane Safety Day, did you know that on October 15, 2017 we celebrated the 57th birthday of the Federation Center of the Blind which was dedicated on October 15, 1961.

Positive Note 1629

November 1, 2017

Memo To:  Executive Officers, Board Members, Chapter & Division Presidents & Others

From:  Frank Coppel, President

Positive Note 1629

Greetings Fellow Federationists:

 

During the next few weeks, I will be contacting hotels in the Columbia area for the purpose of determining a site for the 2018 NFB of SC State convention.  Since state conventions have been held in Myrtle Beach and Greenville during the last two years, I believe many members would prefer the 2018 state convention be located in an area of the state which is more convenient for all of our members to attend.  My plans are to read and thoroughly discuss various hotel proposals with the NFB of SC Board of Directors during our December 2, meeting at Rocky Bottom and discuss this decision made by the State Board with the membership during the Statewide Seminar which will be held on January 6, 2018.

We have an announcement from Jennifer Bazer, Children’s Camp Director.  “Children’s Camp of the Blind will be held June 10-16, 2018 at Rocky Bottom Retreat and Conference Center of the Blind. The camp is for legally blind children ages 6-16. Please contact Jennifer Bazer, Children’s Camp Director at 803-960-9977 or jhipp25@sc.rr.com if you are interested in learning more about the camp, wish to participate or become a junior counselor. The online application will be available the first of 2018 for free registration. The application deadline is June 1, 2018.”

We have an announcement from David Houck, Director of the Federation Center.  “We may wish to remind our Positive Note Readers that we still have a few NFB of SC coffee mugs with lids available for purchase at $10 each and that we have some Myrtle Beach NFB of SC T-shirts in stock.  They are $13 each except for extra large sizes up to 3X which are $15 each.  Order now while we still have your size and wear them to the beach or give them as gifts.  We have only had one convention in Myrtle Beach.  This is a collector’s item!”

The National Federation of the Blind knows that blindness is not the characteristic that defines you or your future.  Every day, we raise the expectations of blind people because low expectations create obstacles between blind people and our dreams.  You can live the life you want:  blindness is not what holds you back.  Joining me for comments in this Positive Note is the President Emeritus of the NFB of SC.  Here is Dr. Capps.

One of the nicest pioneers in South Carolina who is well known to the blind is our own Jenny Smith of Anderson.  Jenny is a member of the Anderson Chapter where she has been an active volunteer since the early 1950’s, as she and her late husband Jimmie were married in 1952.  Jimmie and I attended SCSDB at the same time.  She had the adventure of growing up with ten brothers and sisters, with her being the tenth.  Jenny lived in Anderson all her life and attended public schools there.  Jenny and her husband Jimmie had four very fine children.  All four are college graduates.  Here is where they have been working:  Lynn is a successful practicing Optometrist in Birmingham.  Melinda has her PhD and worked as Vice President of TMK NE but she now works at the Atlanta headquarters of Chick-fil-A in their research department.  Deborah lives in Anderson and worked on the staff of AMED Health Rehabilitation Hospital and now works for Owen Rugs in Anderson.  Steve is on the staff of Duke Power Company where he has been employed for several decades at this electric company.  Married at age 15, Jenny has always been an excellent money manager, beginning her career shortly after her marriage to Jimmie.  Before establishing their upholstery and furniture business, Jimmie worked for a few years with a blind friend making mattresses.  Jenny and Jimmie were an excellent business team.  They developed a large upholstery and furniture business, having to construct a big building to accommodate their ever growing business.  Both having sound judgment, they invested namely in property and other business opportunities.  Jenny still does some work and has lived in the same house for some 65 years.  Jenny has attended some 15 to 20 national conventions and 35 state conventions of the federation.  Jenny has served the blind in many ways, in transportation assistance, and in driving the van to RBRCCB for the annual Lions fishing expeditions.  Jenny was also the recipient of the 1989 Associate Member of the Year Award, demonstrating her commitment to the blind over several decades.  A member of the Anderson Lions Club, she enjoys her participation in this civic organization.  She has also served as the President and First Vice President of the Anderson Lions Club.  The entire Smith family has been very generous to RBRCCB.  One bedroom in the Conference Center is named in memory of Jimmie Smith, as he passed away in March 2003, and a second room is named in memory of her parents, Mr. & Mrs. Madden.  There was also a contribution to the children’s playground.  Her hobbies include quilting, gardening and raising flowers.  She is a member of a local Presbyterian Church.  This is an extraordinary lady and while she is an Associate member having her sight, she is qualified to be in the spotlight in this week’s Positive Note.  Her immediate family loves her and so does her federation family.

 

Final Thought:  Live the life you want – Our NFB President Mark Riccobono got his start by driving a car around the Daytona International Speedway a few years ago, which reminds me that it was Henry Ford who once stated, “Auto racing began as soon as the second car rolled off the assembly line.”

Positive Note 1628

October 23, 2017
Memo To:  Executive Officers, Board Members, Chapter & Division Presidents & Others
From:  Frank Coppel, President
Positive Note 1628
Greetings Fellow Federationists:

During the past month Rocky Bottom has greatly benefited as the recipient of much needed repairs done by volunteers from various civic and church organizations.
A few weeks ago, a group from the Salem Lions Club, longtime friends of Rocky Bottom, spent an entire day repairing and replacing the railings around The Samuel M. Lawton Hall as well as building a railing along the trail nearest to the pond.
This past weekend, a small group of volunteers from Mt.
Hebron United Methodist Church in West Columbia arrived at Rocky Bottom Thursday afternoon, October 19.
This is the fourth time the missions team from Mt.
Hebron has come to volunteer their services at Rocky Bottom and I am told they did a wonderful job in the Ellenburg Lodge completing such tasks as painting the outside deck, replacing five exhaust fans and shower heads in many of the bathrooms, painting one of the bed rooms, and replacing caulking in the kitchen.
I would like to especially recognize Ed and Julie Bible, David Bundy, and Jennifer Bazer who are members of Mt.
Hebron United Methodist Church and who continue to play an instrumental role in the partnership between the Church and Rocky Bottom.
Also this past weekend, a number of Boy Scouts and their leaders from Troop 425 in Lexington, South Carolina volunteered their services at Rocky Bottom by clearing out the trail located near the pond.
They are planning to return to Rocky Bottom in the near future to clear out other hiking trails located around our property.
Linda Bible tells me this coming weekend, a group from Holland Street Baptist Church located in West Columbia will be volunteering their services at Rocky Bottom.
They are planning to bring a group of workers to power wash the deck on the back side of the Conference Center as well as doing much needed grounds keeping around the banks of the creeks which border our property.

Throughout the years, Rocky Bottom has benefited a great deal by having many wonderful individuals and organizations volunteer their services at our facilities.
We owe a great deal of gratitude and appreciation to these individuals and organizations for their hard work and their continued support of Rocky Bottom.

The National Federation of the Blind knows that blindness is not the characteristic that defines you or your future.
Every day, we raise the expectations of blind people because low expectations create obstacles between blind people and our dreams.
You can live the life you want:  blindness is not what holds you back.
Joining me for comments in this Positive Note is the President Emeritus of the NFB of SC.
Here is Dr. Capps.

The weekly Positive Note has now entered its 32nd year of continued service to the blind of the state.
Its inception was in August of 1986.
At that time the primary purpose was to disseminate up-to-date information without delay.
For many years now it has grown in service concerning information in numerous areas with the state President Frank Coppel leading the way.
I feel privileged to be able to participate primarily in saluting members across the state for their service.
The NFB of SC has many dedicated and committed members who we believe are unsurpassed across the country.
From time to time over the years we have received responses from those members who have been “spotlighted” showing genuine appreciation.
Recently we received the following responses from two of our spotlight members.
Here are the following:

“From Jamie Allison, September 26, 2018 Good afternoon,
Dr. Capps, I want to offer a heartfelt and sincere thank you for choosing me to spotlight on this week’s positive note.
I still feel like I am a NFB rookie in comparison to so many of my Federation heroes who have been working for many years to advance the organization and the rights and roles of blind citizens.
It was quite an honor to be chosen and I was pretty taken aback when David called me to get the information you would need to write the piece.
I really enjoy reading the Positive Note each week and want to also thank you for taking the time to contribute to it.
Know that mom and I both think of you and Betty almost daily and we are constantly praying for you both.

David, let me also think you for your hard work in assisting President Coppel and Dr. Capps with getting the Positive Note produced and sent out each week.
I know there is a lot of time and effort that goes into it and it is much appreciated!

 

:From Winnifred Spears, September 27, 2017  Dear Dr. Capps:
Lenora had the article in the “Positive Note” read at our meeting.
Thank you for such a nice article on me.
It has been a pleasure to volunteer; otherwise I would not have met so many great people and friends.
Our chapter is small but we are going strong.
We want to figure out how to get some young people interested.

Last week I spent a few days in my favorite place, that’s right, in Rocky Bottom.
It was my second visit this year.
With this being the Autumn season, God’s creation was evident everywhere.
This was highlighted with the outstanding weather we had.
Upon our arrival we were greeted by the fine Resident Manager, Linda Bible who advised me that JJ, our resident duck, still resides in the Eddie Mae Lucas Webb Memorial Pond.
JJ has a new girlfriend.
More power to him.

Final Thought:  Live the life you want –  Be an example for others to follow.

 

Rideshare

Dear fellow Federationists:   The National Federation of the Blind has created a rideshare testing program to measure Lyft and Uber’s efforts to eliminate driver discrimination against riders with guide dogs or service animals. Recent agreements with these two major ridesharing companies require the National Federation of the Blind to provide feedback, over the next three to five years, on the efforts they have agreed to undertake to prevent discrimination against service animal users.   Here’s where you come in. If you use Uber or Lyft and have a service animal or travel with someone who has a service animal, we need your help. Fill out our online questionnaire after your next Uber or Lyft ride, and as often as you can after that. We would love feedback from regular Uber and Lyft users at least once a month, about both positive and negative experiences. You will find the questionnaire at https://nfb.org/rideshare-test.   Extensive information about the program is available in the May issue of the Braille Monitor. You can also visit nfb.org/rideshare for more information, including an extensive FAQ, information on how to report discrimination to Uber and Lyft directly as well as through our questionnaire, and a list of the questions we’ll ask so you can be thinking about them when you take your next ride.   Please share this information with fellow Uber and Lyft users with guide dogs or other service animals, including non-members of the National Federation of the Blind.   If you have questions that are not answered by the resources above, contact Valerie Yingling, Legal Program Coordinator, at the National Federation of the Blind Jernigan Institute, at (410) 659-9314 extension 2440, or vyingling@nfb.org.   Thanks in advance for your assistance with this important effort.   Sincerely,   The National Federation of the Blind Communications Team     Christopher S. Danielsen, J.D. Director of Public Relations 200 East Wells Street, Baltimore, MD 21230 (410) 659-9314, Ext. 2330 | cdanielsen@nfb.org

Positive Note 1627

October 18, 2017

Memo To:  Executive Officers, Board Members, Chapter & Division Presidents & Others

From:  Frank Coppel, President

Positive Note 1627

Greetings Fellow Federationists:

 

I hope many of you are planning to attend The 2017 Christmas Board Retreat which will occur at Rocky Bottom the weekend of December 1, 2, and3.  This will be a busy time since we will be holding two Board meetings beginning with the RBRCCB Board of Directors meeting Saturday, December 2, at 9:30 a.m. and ending with the NFB of SC Board meeting at 2:00 p.m.  Saturday evening will be a time for observing the Christmas season, singing carols, fellowship, and eating delicious desserts.  I hope we will have a large turnout.  Make plans to be there!

I trust all of you are working very hard to sell your 2018 Orlando National Convention bus tickets.  I am hopeful ticket sales and what we charge for each seat will cover the cost for the chartered bus.  Remember, the drawing will be held at the conclusion of the Statewide Seminar on January 6, 2018.  The individual who purchases the winning ticket will receive $300, the seller of the winning ticket will receive $100 and the chapter who sells the most tickets will receive $300.

We have an announcement from Demetrius Williford, vice President of the Anderson chapter. “I wanted to inform every one of our annual walk that took place on October 14, 2017. We had a wonderful time and a large showing. Also, I want to inform everyone we are still hosting our first dance affair on November 4 2017 at the American Legion in Anderson South Carolina. The time will be 6 PM until

10 PM the ticket sales are $15 for adults $10 for kids. We will be having a banquet as well as a live DJ and door prizes.”

On Thursday evening October 12, the Columbia Chapter held elections of officers for 2018.  Congratulations to the following individuals who were elected to office.

 

President – Tiffiny Mitchell

First Vice President – Steve Cook

Second Vice President – Isaiah Nelson

Secretary – Dorothy Barksdale

Treasurer – Kattie Jackson

Board Members – Karen Jones and Jennifer Bazer

 

The National Federation of the Blind knows that blindness is not the characteristic that defines you or your future.  Every day, we raise the expectations of blind people because low expectations create obstacles between blind people and our dreams.  You can live the life you want:  blindness is not what holds you back.  Joining me for comments in this Positive Note is the President Emeritus of the NFB of SC.  Here is Dr. Capps.

This week’s spotlight falls upon a longtime member and Loris Chapter President, none other than Alma Lee Doyle.  Alma Lee was raised and has lived in the Loris area all her life.  She attended school in Loris as well.  Her parents had eleven children, seven girls and four boys.  Alma Lee married B. D. Doyle in 1952.  B. D. was President of the Loris Chapter as well for several years until his death.  They had four children, two boys and two girls.  Alma Lee says that today she has seven grandchildren, eight great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild.  She worked on a farm until 1960 when she secured a job with Public Works for over 40 years.  B. D. and Alma Lee joined the federation in 1979 and were members of the Conway Chapter until the Loris Chapter was organized.  They were chapter presidents in Loris ever since.  While Alma Lee Doyle has attended over two decades of state conventions, she has not attended a national convention as yet.  She has attended many Statewide Seminars at the Federation Center of the Blind in Columbia.  She loves Rocky Bottom and has worked many a Fun Day Festival and attended several Rocky Bottom Christmas Board Retreats.  In order for her to attend Rocky Bottom she must drive across the state from almost Myrtle Beach to get to RBRCCB, a distance of 300 miles one way.  She usually brings two or three others with her from Loris as well.  Her hobbies include gardening, canning and making a variety of preserves.  Her fig preserves are especially good.  In fact, she sells her preserves at the Old Country Store as a Fun Day fundraiser each year.  Alma Lee has raised much funding over the years for RBRCCB.  In fact, a few years ago, she single handedly sold more $5 Fun Day tickets than any other chapter in the state, yes, even Columbia, in order to receive $300 for the Loris Chapter treasury.  She also provides transportation for those who need it on a voluntary basis.  She is a member of the Macedonia Baptist Church and she really loves the Lord.  As you can see, Alma Lee Doyle is an active federationist and does much for the blind both locally and statewide.  Congratulations Alma Lee!

 

Final Thought:  Living the life you want means not letting others tell you it can’t be done.  It can be done if you are creative and don’t quit.